2017 Art Galleries: Opening Reception

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Three Artist Explorations:
Gina Adams, Katie Caron & Emily Quinn
January 17 – March 3, 2017
Meet the Artists Reception: Friday, January 27, 2017
From 5:30 – 8:00 p.m.
Nalanda Campus – 6287 Arapahoe, Boulder

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(January 23, 2017) Please join us for the opening reception on Friday, January 27 from 5:30-8:00 p.m. to celebrate three prominent artists and their work at Naropa University’s School of the Arts galleries on the Nalanda Campus at 6287 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301. Treaty reading and performance by artist, Gina Adams at 6:00 p.m. Gallery hours are Monday–Friday: 10:00 a.m.-5 p.m.

Its Honor is Here Pledged: Broken Treaty Quilts in the White Cube Gallery

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Gina Adams exhibition Its Honor is Here Pledged: Broken Treaty Quilts has everything to do with particular, painful moments in so-called modern time: when ‘white man’ broke his promise over and over again to the originals settlers and people of America: Native Americans. “I have been cutting out the letters of entire Broken Treaties–these were pacts written by the United States Government and signed by Native American Tribes. These pacts promised the tribes money and power in exchange for the rich land they called home for possibly thousands of years. The Government took the land; however the Tribes were left penniless”. The exhibit invites the visitor to step inside the gallery and witness words from the past that continue to be broken.

Autonomic Healing in the Lounge Gallery                                                  

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Autonomic healing is defined as: fully self-contained and requiring no external intervention of any kind. Katie Caron creates an enigmatic environment that is haunting in its seemingly embryonic stage. As the viewer’s looks into each “frame” – the connection begins between the works much like the frames in a film. Katie uses unnatural materials (such as the tailings of rubber dog toys and recycled plastic) to understand the interaction/reaction of the natural world with “mechanical” created debris.

I Confine Myself in the Nalanda Gallery

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Emily Quinn’s oil paintings in I Confine Myself, examine stereotypical gender roles and aspects of Southern culture using absurdity and mystery to emphasize what is often kept hidden or left unsaid. Working loosely from her experiences, memories, and family history, Emily creates narratives that exist in the nexus between fantasy and reality. These narratives are about time, memory, family, and the imagination’s ability to shape all three.

 

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